Skip to main content

Crohn's & Colitis
blogs, news & research

News

Inflammatory bowel disease tied to heart attack risk


Inflammatory bowel disease tied to heart attack risk

(Reuters Health) – – People with inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis may be up to 12 times more likely to have a heart attack, a U.S. study suggests.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) involves chronic or recurring inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s are the most common forms. People with Crohn’s have inflammation throughout the digestive tract, while in ulcerative colitis, only the large intestine is inflamed.

While chronic inflammation in the body has long been linked to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, the potential for conditions like Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis to lead to heart attacks isn’t as well understood, the study team notes in the journal Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

The researchers examined a nationwide database of medical records for more than 29 million people, including almost 132,000 with ulcerative colitis and 159,000 with Crohn’s disease.

Over the five-year study period, people with IBD were 25 percent more likely than those without the disorder to have a heart attack, the study found.

“IBD should be regarded as an independent risk factor for the development of heart disease,” said senior author Dr. Mahazarin Ginwalla of University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center in Ohio.

This means people with IBD should be monitored carefully for cardiac risk factors like smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes and high cholesterol, Ginwalla said by email. Treating risk factors, and keeping symptoms of IBD controlled, may lower the risk of heart attacks, Ginwalla said.

For people with IBD, “the risk of adverse cardiovascular events is highest during active flares or persistent disease, with this risk diminishing during times of remission,” Ginwalla added.

During the study, 3.3 percent of people without IBD had a heart attack, compared to 6.7 percent of patients with ulcerative colitis and 8.8 percent of individuals with Crohn’s disease.

The biggest increased risk of heart attacks for people with IBD was seen among younger people.

IBD patients ages 30 to 34 were 12 times more likely to have a heart attack than people in their age group without IBD, the study found.

Read the full article on https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-heart-ibd/inflammatory-bowel-disease-tied-to-heart-attack-risk-idUSKBN1OC2Z2

 

Posted on: January 2 2019

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This is the first study to show that BPA can negatively impact gut microbial amino acid metabolism in a way that has been associated with irritable bowel disease   Jennifer DeLuca, first author for the study By the way! The best essay writing service - https://www.easyessay.pro/

Good article. I certainly appreciate this site. Continue the good work!

I was very interested in the article "Good Vs bad bacteria - the bugs responsible for Crohn's disease". I was diagnosed with IBD 6 months ago and after a very bad reaction to Pentasa (but unproven) I was told to wait and try again when the symptoms peaked again. However, I started taking Probiotics each day and (touch wood) I have been in remission for 5 months, with high hopes. I am very interested in the research in this field.

My 16 year old daughter was diagnosed with UC in July 2016 and after 4 flare ups within 12 months and trying different medications, she was prescribed infliximab. This has been the miracle medication for her and am so thankful that she has been able to return to a "relatively normal life", enjoying school and her passion for sports again (bar 8 weekly visits to PMH for inflixmab infusions, routine colonoscopies and mezzaline daily). I had very little knowledge of UC and autoimmunie disease for that matter; and was shellshocked at how debilitating it can be. We are so grateful to have a wonderful gastro and medical team supporting my daughter and of course the impact that inflixmab has had; however know it is still early days and don't want to take anything for granted.


About the author


Crohns & Colitis