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Find Support

CCA’s primary objective is to provide support services, advice and encouragement for people living with inflammatory bowel disease. Click on the links below to find out more about our various support services.

 

On this page:

IBD Helpline

Individual help, information and guidance on Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, provided by our helpline coordinator. Call 1800 138 029 and press option 1 to access this service during business hours, Monday to Friday AEST.

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Support Groups

Crohn’s and Colitis support group meetings provide a safe environment where individuals impacted by IBD can express themselves openly and receive support and understanding from others with similar experiences. All members, including the facilitator are impacted by Crohn’s or ulcerative colitis (IBD) in some way.

Upcoming support group meetings are listed on our Support Groups page.

Please read our privacy policy.

For more information, or to register your interest in attending a support group, or starting a group in your area, please phone 1800 138 029 or email.

Find a support group in your area

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IBD Information Forums

Crohn’s & Colitis Australia’s IBD information forums provide much needed specialised information for people diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease, their families and carers. Particularly useful for those recently diagnosed, the forums offer participants education and support and strategies to identify and establish links with the existing local community support structures.

Upcoming Forums

Resources from Past Forums

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FOR PARENTS, KIDS AND TEENS

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For Parents

Being diagnosed with IBD is challenging for anyone – but having a young child diagnosed is distressing and daunting for the whole family. There are usually hundreds of questions:

  • Why did my child get this?
  • Is it something we did (or didn’t) do?
  • How is IBD treated?
  • What are our options?
  • Will she have a normal life?
  • What does the future hold for him?
  • Will my other children also get this disease?
  • What is IBD anyway?

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For Teens

Similarly, being a teenager is hard enough without having to deal with the challenges of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both the symptoms of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and the side-effects of many of the treatments, seem designed to cause maximum embarrassment and disruption to every aspect of your life.

Weight loss, fatigue, joint pain, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, surgical scarring, extended hospital stays, delayed puberty and/or corticosteroid puffiness; it’s no wonder that many young people with IBD feel isolated, frustrated, stressed, anxious or depressed.

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You and your Family are not Alone

Meeting others who are going through similar challenges, learning more about the illness and taking a proactive interest in treatment can make a big difference in your life. CCA has a range of resources and services that can help you including:

Browse our website, read about other people’s experiences and call our office (1800 138 029) to have information sent directly to you.

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GP Audit and Education Module

Click here to find out more.

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The latest news and Research

News

Snack ideas for Crohn’s disease

Posted: November 14 2019

During remission When symptoms are in remission, it is important to eat a nutrient-rich diet, which should include: Fiber: However, high fiber diets are not good for some people with Crohn’s. Protein: Stick with sources of lean protein, such as fish, eggs, nuts, and tofu. Calcium: Choose lactose free products, if dairy is a trigger, […]

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Personal Story

“They told me candies, milkshakes, and pizza were all fine”

Posted: November 14 2019

Scott Lippman was on a vacation with his wife in Central America in 2013 when he suddenly got sick. “We were nervous about it, so we cut the trip short,” says Lippman. Back home in New York, though, he wasn’t getting better. In fact, little by little, he was getting worse. “I was losing weight. […]

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Research

Patients with ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease demonstrate increased risk for psychiatric illnesses

Individuals with ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn disease (CD) are more likely to have depression, anxiety, and bipolar disorder.

Patients with inflammatory bowel disease, including UC and CD, have been shown to be at increased risk for psychiatric illnesses, although most previous studies have had limited patient populations. The researchers retrospectively reviewed a large commercial database of information collected between 2013 and 2019 to better define the epidemiology of several psychiatric illnesses (depression, anxiety, bipolar […]

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Personal Story

How to become a loud, proud advocate for people with ulcerative colitis

Posted: November 14 2019

When I was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis (UC) in 2012, I sensed my life was going to change drastically — and not just because of the everyday work of managing my symptoms. My feelings were confirmed when I was admitted for my first long hospital stay, during which I learned I had pancolitis, a form […]

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News

Australia’s enthusiasm for medicinal emu oil takes flight, as producers push to keep up with demand

Posted: November 12 2019

Veteran emu farmer Wayne Piltz said the market has grown significantly in recent years, but production has not risen with it. Mr Piltz, now the only emu farmer in South Australia, currently has about 1,000 chicks at his Moorook farm in the state’s Riverland region. “It’s just got to the stage where there’s a lot […]

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Personal Story

Lemonade stand helps fight Cronh’s disease

Posted: November 12 2019

On the Friday before Labor Day, a quiet side street in Canton, Massachusetts, is buzzing with activity. Cars line both sides of the street, and kids ride their bikes back and forth. Local firetrucks and police cars sound their alarms in celebration. In fact, it seems the entire town of Canton has descended upon the […]

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