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Crohn’s Disease Treatment

How is Crohn’s disease treated?

The treatment of Crohn’s disease will vary with each individual and will depend on the location and severity of inflammation within the GI tract. It is important to remember that Crohn’s disease cannot be cured by medication or surgery. Both treatment strategies however can effectively relieve symptoms and give one a better quality of life.

Medication

Several types of medications are available that reduce the inflammation and give the intestines a chance to heal. Often, the same medications will be used in treating flare-ups and preventing symptoms during remission, but will usually be administered in different dosages and schedules.

Surgery

Some people with Crohn’s disease might require surgery to remove diseased portions of the intestine or to treat complications that arose when a medical treatment was ineffective. But even if diseased parts of the intestines are removed, Crohn’s disease can re-appear in other areas.

Crohn’s Disease Diet

Proper diet and nutrition play an important role in relieving symptoms of Crohn’s disease, replacing lost nutrients, and preventing unwanted weight loss.

X-Rays and Endoscopy Procedures

Although x-rays and endoscopy procedures are generally kept to a minimum for those diagnosed with Crohn’s disease, it is likely they will need to be repeated from time to time to determine success after surgery or, more routinely:
• to check on the extent of the inflammation
• to see if there are any changes in tissues (e.g., development of pre-cancerous cells)
• to determine whether on not a particular treatment strategy is working.

Additional Information:

The latest news and Research

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Real advice for parenting through UC

Posted: July 6 2020

Plan for Flares “I have a 6-month old, and I recently experienced a severe flare,” says Jamie D., of Chelan, WA. “I knew I was going to need a plan for when I was running to the bathroom 10 times a day on the days my husband was gone. (He’s a firefighter, so I’m home […]

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Research

The microbiome in inflammatory bowel diseases

From pathogenesis to therapy.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has become a global disease with accelerating incidence worldwide in the 21st century while its accurate etiology remains unclear. In the past decade, gut microbiota dysbiosis has consistently been associated with IBD. Although many IBD-associated dysbiosis have not been proven to be a cause or an effect of IBD, it is […]

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Cloning stem cells to find a cure for Crohn’s disease

Posted: July 6 2020

For over a decade, Wa Xian, research associate professor of biology and biochemistry at the University of Houston Stem Cell Center, has been perfecting technology for cloning stem cells. Now she is using it to take aim at pediatric Crohn’s disease. Xian, who received a $1.9 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and […]

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Greater recurrence of CRC in late-onset vs early onset IBD

Posted: June 27 2020

These findings suggest a difference in colorectal cancer pathophysiology by age, according to the researchers. “Despite longer IBD disease duration at the time of colon or rectal cancer diagnosis, patients with early-onset IBD had significantly more advanced colitis at the time of diagnosis of colon and rectal cancer,” Robert Goldstone, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital general and GI surgeon, […]

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‘Important’ microbiome studies offer hope for IBD prediction

Posted: June 26 2020

We may be able to predict disease relapse in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases based on their microbiome markers, according researchers from APC Microbiome Ireland. Read ‘Important’ microbiome studies offer hope for IBD prediction by Nikki Hancocks

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Could good oral health be the key to treating inflammatory bowel disease?

Posted: June 26 2020

Some conditions such as cardiovascular disease, respiratory infections, and diabetes are related to poor oral health. Now researchers from the University of Michigan (U-M) Medical and Dental School discovered that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that included Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, may be the latest condition made worse by poor oral health. The mouse study […]

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