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Find Support

CCA’s primary objective is to provide support services, advice and encouragement for people living with inflammatory bowel disease. Click on the links below to find out more about our various support services.

 

On this page:

IBD Helpline

Individual help, information and guidance on Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, provided by our helpline coordinator. Call 1800 138 029 and press option 1 to access this service during business hours, Monday to Friday AEST.

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Support Groups

Crohn’s and Colitis support group meetings provide a safe environment where individuals impacted by IBD can express themselves openly and receive support and understanding from others with similar experiences. All members, including the facilitator are impacted by Crohn’s or ulcerative colitis (IBD) in some way.

Upcoming support group meetings are listed on our Support Groups page.

Please read our privacy policy.

For more information, or to register your interest in attending a support group, or starting a group in your area, please phone 1800 138 029 or email.

Find a support group in your area

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IBD Information Forums

Crohn’s & Colitis Australia’s IBD information forums provide much needed specialised information for people diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease, their families and carers. Particularly useful for those recently diagnosed, the forums offer participants education and support and strategies to identify and establish links with the existing local community support structures.

Upcoming Forums

Resources from Past Forums

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FOR PARENTS, KIDS AND TEENS

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For Parents

Being diagnosed with IBD is challenging for anyone – but having a young child diagnosed is distressing and daunting for the whole family. There are usually hundreds of questions:

  • Why did my child get this?
  • Is it something we did (or didn’t) do?
  • How is IBD treated?
  • What are our options?
  • Will she have a normal life?
  • What does the future hold for him?
  • Will my other children also get this disease?
  • What is IBD anyway?

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For Teens

Similarly, being a teenager is hard enough without having to deal with the challenges of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both the symptoms of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and the side-effects of many of the treatments, seem designed to cause maximum embarrassment and disruption to every aspect of your life.

Weight loss, fatigue, joint pain, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, surgical scarring, extended hospital stays, delayed puberty and/or corticosteroid puffiness; it’s no wonder that many young people with IBD feel isolated, frustrated, stressed, anxious or depressed.

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You and your Family are not Alone

Meeting others who are going through similar challenges, learning more about the illness and taking a proactive interest in treatment can make a big difference in your life. CCA has a range of resources and services that can help you including:

Browse our website, read about other people’s experiences and call our office (1800 138 029) to have information sent directly to you.

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GP Audit and Education Module

Click here to find out more.

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The latest news and Research

Personal Story

Why I put my Crohn’s on film

Posted: June 4 2020

In order to raise awareness of Crohn’s disease, 17-year-old Matty Fisher from Mill Hill has made a short film, Life Goes On, documenting his own struggle with the debilitating disease. He was just 14 when he started experiencing symptoms, and soon received the diagnosis. Crohn’s is a type of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), characterised by the […]

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Personal Story

Stopping the stigma and normalising the stoma

Posted: June 3 2020

A young woman in regional South Australia is trying to change the conversation around bowel disease in her local community, after being diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis. Riverland resident Aleysha Lange said she was a regular 20-year-old who enjoyed playing netball, reading, hanging out with friends and going to work. But since her bowel disease diagnosis […]

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News

Cholecystectomy linked with disease activity in Crohn’s

Posted: June 3 2020

Filippos Koutroumpakis, MD, from the University of Pittsburgh division of gastroenterology, hepatology and nutrition, said in a recorded presentation that removing the gallbladder allows for continuous drainage of bile acid into the gastrointestinal tract leading to the development of secondary bile acids, which have been shown to cause gene mutations and adenomas in animal studies. “In human […]

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Research

The rundown of dietary supplements and their effects on inflammatory bowel disease

Some specific substances should be analysed for their benefits or drawbacks in the course of IBD. Such substances are probiotics, polyphenols, fibers, fatty acids, as well as certain low FODMAP diets to be discussed.

Inflammatory bowel diseases, including Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, are a life-long, chronic, and relapsing problem affecting 11.2 million people worldwide. To date, there is pharmacological therapy to treat symptoms such as diarrhea, constipation, and abdominal cramping/pain. These medications also help to alleviate everyday discomfort; however, there are no curative therapies. Recent studies have investigated […]

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Personal Story

Kathleen Baker didn’t let Crohn’s block her olympic dream – now she’s ready for another

Posted: May 28 2020

When swimmer Kathleen Baker started shedding pounds at the age of 12, she knew something wasn’t right, but was hesitant to admit it. She was already an elite athlete at that point with not much weight to lose. “I ran fevers for weeks and weeks on end,” Baker said, “I had pretty much every gastrointestinal […]

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News

Fungus in the gut

Posted: May 27 2020

Higher levels of a type of fungus in the gut are associated with better outcomes for patients with a type of inflammatory bowel disease called ulcerative colitis who are treated with gut microbes from healthy donors, according to a new study by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators. The study, published April 15 in Cell Host & Microbe, […]

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