Skip to main content

Find Support

CCA’s primary objective is to provide support services, advice and encouragement for people living with inflammatory bowel disease. Click on the links below to find out more about our various support services.

 

On this page:

IBD Helpline

Individual help, information and guidance on Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, provided by our helpline coordinator. Call 1800 138 029 and press option 1 to access this service during business hours, Monday to Friday AEST.

Back to top

Support Groups

Crohn’s and Colitis support group meetings provide a safe environment where individuals impacted by IBD can express themselves openly and receive support and understanding from others with similar experiences. All members, including the facilitator are impacted by Crohn’s or ulcerative colitis (IBD) in some way.

Upcoming support group meetings are listed on our Support Groups page.

Please read our privacy policy.

For more information, or to register your interest in attending a support group, or starting a group in your area, please phone 1800 138 029 or email.

Find a support group in your area

Back to top

IBD Information Forums

Crohn’s & Colitis Australia’s IBD information forums provide much needed specialised information for people diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease, their families and carers. Particularly useful for those recently diagnosed, the forums offer participants education and support and strategies to identify and establish links with the existing local community support structures.

Upcoming Forums

Resources from Past Forums

Back to top

FOR PARENTS, KIDS AND TEENS

Back to top

For Parents

Being diagnosed with IBD is challenging for anyone – but having a young child diagnosed is distressing and daunting for the whole family. There are usually hundreds of questions:

  • Why did my child get this?
  • Is it something we did (or didn’t) do?
  • How is IBD treated?
  • What are our options?
  • Will she have a normal life?
  • What does the future hold for him?
  • Will my other children also get this disease?
  • What is IBD anyway?

Back to top

For Teens

Similarly, being a teenager is hard enough without having to deal with the challenges of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Both the symptoms of Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and the side-effects of many of the treatments, seem designed to cause maximum embarrassment and disruption to every aspect of your life.

Weight loss, fatigue, joint pain, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, surgical scarring, extended hospital stays, delayed puberty and/or corticosteroid puffiness; it’s no wonder that many young people with IBD feel isolated, frustrated, stressed, anxious or depressed.

Back to top

You and your Family are not Alone

Meeting others who are going through similar challenges, learning more about the illness and taking a proactive interest in treatment can make a big difference in your life. CCA has a range of resources and services that can help you including:

Browse our website, read about other people’s experiences and call our office (1800 138 029) to have information sent directly to you.

Back to top

GP Audit and Education Module

Click here to find out more.

Back to top

The latest news and Research

Personal Story

‘People think when you have inflammatory bowel disease that you just go to the toilet a lot, but it’s more than that…’

Posted: December 5 2019

I was actually diagnosed during Crohn’s and Colitis Awareness Week two years ago, which was a bit of a coincidence. It just came out of nowhere – I had been pregnant with my second baby and there were some things during the pregnancy that I suppose were a sign that something was going on, but […]

Read more

Personal Story

‘It’s humiliating when someone tuts at you for using a disabled loo’

Posted: December 5 2019

Two years after his diagnosis, Mesha decided to have an operation to have a stoma created, where an ileostomy bag is attached. This means that his body now bypasses the large intestine and the waste is collected in the bag that sits outside his body. Now, he works as a personal trainer and when his […]

Read more

News

Investigating the human intestinal mucus barrier up-close and personal

Posted: December 5 2019

We have a mutualistic but complicated relationship with the collection of microbes in our gut, known as the intestinal microbiome. This complex community of bacteria breaks down different food components, and releases nutrients such as vitamins and a plethora of other factors that control functions in tissues way beyond the intestinal tract. However, the sheer […]

Read more

News

Mental health diagnoses common in IBD, but may be lessening in veterans

Posted: December 3 2019

“The aim of this study was to identify temporal trends in incidence and prevalence of these mental health problems, including anxiety, depression and PTSD in this population of veteran patients with IBD,” they wrote. “Identifying these comorbid mental health problems within this patient population would improve health care practices by helping providers streamline appropriate treatment […]

Read more

Personal Story

Allison Zuck’s personal experience with Crohn’s

Posted: December 3 2019

When I first started experiencing the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease, I was just 20 years old. It was the beginning of my junior year of college – I was studying abroad in Versailles, just outside of Paris – and I noticed something was wrong within my first month there. I was having constant stomach […]

Read more

Personal Story

What it’s like to live with both a mental and physical illness at the same time

Posted: December 3 2019

I am one of those lucky people who live with both a chronic illness and mental illness. I have ulcerative colitis, a form of inflammatory bowel disease which led to the removal of my large intestine, and I also have bipolar disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), borderline personality disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). And yes, it can […]

Read more