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BPA risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease?


BPA risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease

A recent study in a preclinical model of inflammatory bowel disease shows dietary exposure to bisphenol-A, or BPA, found in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins, can increase mortality and worsen its symptoms.

Dr. Clint Allred, a Texas A&M AgriLife researcher in the nutrition and food science department at Texas A&M University in College Station, led a study recently published in the Experimental Biology and Medicine journal.

“This is the first study to show that BPA can negatively impact gut microbial amino acid metabolism in a way that has been associated with irritable bowel disease,” said Jennifer DeLuca, a graduate student in the nutrition and food science department and first author for the study.

Also participating on the study were Dr. Kimberly Allred, also with the nutrition and food science department, and Rami Menon, a chemical engineer in the department of chemical engineering at Texas A&M.

Irritable bowel disease, or IBD, is a complex collection of diseases that include ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. There is chronic inflammation of the digestive tract, and symptoms related to IBD can include severe diarrhea, abdominal pain, fatigue and weight loss. More serious instances can require lifelong treatment or possibly surgery.

“While the causes of IBD have not yet been determined, environmental exposures such as diet, smoking, infections, altered gut microbiome and toxins or pollutants are risk-factors for development and relapse,” Allred said. “In this study, we wanted to focus on what effect BPA may have on IBD.”

BPA is found in polycarbonate plastics often used in making containers to store food and beverages, such as water bottles. It is also found in epoxy resins used to coat the inside of metal products, such as food cans, bottle tops and water supply lines. In addition, some dental sealants and composites contain BPA.

Allred said research has previously shown BPA can seep into food or beverages from containers made with it and may have possible health effects on the behavior, the brain and prostate glands of fetuses, infants and children.

Read the full story on www.sciencedaily.com

 

 

Posted on: July 10 2018

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Good article. I certainly appreciate this site. Continue the good work!

I was very interested in the article "Good Vs bad bacteria - the bugs responsible for Crohn's disease". I was diagnosed with IBD 6 months ago and after a very bad reaction to Pentasa (but unproven) I was told to wait and try again when the symptoms peaked again. However, I started taking Probiotics each day and (touch wood) I have been in remission for 5 months, with high hopes. I am very interested in the research in this field.

My 16 year old daughter was diagnosed with UC in July 2016 and after 4 flare ups within 12 months and trying different medications, she was prescribed infliximab. This has been the miracle medication for her and am so thankful that she has been able to return to a "relatively normal life", enjoying school and her passion for sports again (bar 8 weekly visits to PMH for inflixmab infusions, routine colonoscopies and mezzaline daily). I had very little knowledge of UC and autoimmunie disease for that matter; and was shellshocked at how debilitating it can be. We are so grateful to have a wonderful gastro and medical team supporting my daughter and of course the impact that inflixmab has had; however know it is still early days and don't want to take anything for granted.


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Sonakshi Babbar