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About Ulcerative Colitis

Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory condition that generally affects the innermost lining (mucosa) of the large intestine (colon) and rectum. Ulcerative colitis symptoms typically involve the lining becoming inflamed (red and swollen) and tiny open sores (ulcers) forming on the surface of the lining. These ulcers might bleed – in fact, bleeding from the rectum is often a first sign that something’s not quite right. The inflamed lining also produces a larger than normal amount of intestinal lubricant or mucus, which sometimes contains pus. Most people with this condition respond well to colitis treatment, but in more severe cases, surgery may become a necessary path.

How does ulcerative colitis affect the intestines?

Inflammation ‘attacks’ the innermost lining of the colon known as the mucosa, resulting in bleeding and diarrhoea.

The inflammation is most often located in the rectum and lower colon, but can also involve other parts of the colon, sometimes even the entire colon. Less often, it might involve other parts of the intestine. Depending on the exact location of the inflammation, ulcerative colitis is known by other names:

  • Proctitis: involves only the rectum
  • Proctosigmoiditis: involves the rectum and sigmoid colon (the lower segment of the colon before the rectum)
  • Distal colitis: involves only the left side of the colon
  • Pancolitis: involves the entire colon
  • Backwash ileitis: involves the distal ileum.

Additional Information:

The latest news and Research

News

Real advice for parenting through UC

Posted: July 6 2020

Plan for Flares “I have a 6-month old, and I recently experienced a severe flare,” says Jamie D., of Chelan, WA. “I knew I was going to need a plan for when I was running to the bathroom 10 times a day on the days my husband was gone. (He’s a firefighter, so I’m home […]

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Research

The microbiome in inflammatory bowel diseases

From pathogenesis to therapy.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has become a global disease with accelerating incidence worldwide in the 21st century while its accurate etiology remains unclear. In the past decade, gut microbiota dysbiosis has consistently been associated with IBD. Although many IBD-associated dysbiosis have not been proven to be a cause or an effect of IBD, it is […]

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Cloning stem cells to find a cure for Crohn’s disease

Posted: July 6 2020

For over a decade, Wa Xian, research associate professor of biology and biochemistry at the University of Houston Stem Cell Center, has been perfecting technology for cloning stem cells. Now she is using it to take aim at pediatric Crohn’s disease. Xian, who received a $1.9 million grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and […]

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Greater recurrence of CRC in late-onset vs early onset IBD

Posted: June 27 2020

These findings suggest a difference in colorectal cancer pathophysiology by age, according to the researchers. “Despite longer IBD disease duration at the time of colon or rectal cancer diagnosis, patients with early-onset IBD had significantly more advanced colitis at the time of diagnosis of colon and rectal cancer,” Robert Goldstone, MD, Massachusetts General Hospital general and GI surgeon, […]

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‘Important’ microbiome studies offer hope for IBD prediction

Posted: June 26 2020

We may be able to predict disease relapse in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel diseases based on their microbiome markers, according researchers from APC Microbiome Ireland. Read ‘Important’ microbiome studies offer hope for IBD prediction by Nikki Hancocks

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Could good oral health be the key to treating inflammatory bowel disease?

Posted: June 26 2020

Some conditions such as cardiovascular disease, respiratory infections, and diabetes are related to poor oral health. Now researchers from the University of Michigan (U-M) Medical and Dental School discovered that inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that included Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, may be the latest condition made worse by poor oral health. The mouse study […]

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